Foodingly Slanted

Dec 01

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!

(Source: hannah-rosengren)

Nov 18

“The industry isn’t conducive to keeping women in the kitchen. For all the reasons that it’s hard, this isn’t an industry that’s figured out how to get mothers back into the kitchen. The hours are hard, and there are no benefits, like insurance and 401(k)s. It’s not a long term industry.” — Chef Amanda Cohen on women in the restaurant industry. Also related: Yesterday, Mother Jones’ Tom Philpott asks why we ignore lady chefs. (via fritesandfries)

“If you really want to make a friend, go to someone’s house and eat with them - the people who give you their food give you their heart.” — Cesar Chavez (via squaremeal)

Nov 14

squaremeal:

(via Emma Dibben - Illustrator - Portfolio - Food Illustration)

squaremeal:

(via Emma Dibben - Illustrator - Portfolio - Food Illustration)

Oct 11

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recalled thirty furloughed employees on Tuesday to work on the multi-state salmonella outbreak.
So far, nearly 300 people in 18 states have been sickened with the pathogen, which causes fever, cramps, diarrhea, and in severe cases, even death. About 42% of the people infected have had to be hospitalized, about double the normal rate, and the salmonella strain involved is resistant to many antibiotics, making it more dangerous. 
The USDA identified the source of the outbreak as contaminated raw chicken from Foster Farms and said that the products were distributed in supermarkets in Washington State, Oregon, and California but illnesses have been reported in Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. On the company website, Foster Farms wrote that it does not plan to issue a recall on its poultry products. The company writes that the spread of salmonella can be eliminated by properly handling and cooking of raw poultry.
Mother Jones reports that government-shutdown-mandated furloughs may have hampered the CDC’s response to the outbreak, since the lab and molecular detection work that links far-apart cases was not being done. Individual states can use their own resources to pinpoint the source of contaminated food, but they won’t have access to federal government databases.
Many consumer groups have been lobbying the USDA to change the way salmonella outbreaks are handled so that the government can force recalls, arguing that more dangerous strains of salmonella resistant to antibiotics have emerged in recent years.
Consumers who are buying chicken should simply avoid any brand sold with the following plant numbers: P-6137, P-6137A and P-7632. The number can be found on or underneath the packaging label.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recalled thirty furloughed employees on Tuesday to work on the multi-state salmonella outbreak.

So far, nearly 300 people in 18 states have been sickened with the pathogen, which causes fever, cramps, diarrhea, and in severe cases, even death. About 42% of the people infected have had to be hospitalized, about double the normal rate, and the salmonella strain involved is resistant to many antibiotics, making it more dangerous. 

The USDA identified the source of the outbreak as contaminated raw chicken from Foster Farms and said that the products were distributed in supermarkets in Washington State, Oregon, and California but illnesses have been reported in Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. On the company website, Foster Farms wrote that it does not plan to issue a recall on its poultry products. The company writes that the spread of salmonella can be eliminated by properly handling and cooking of raw poultry.

Mother Jones reports that government-shutdown-mandated furloughs may have hampered the CDC’s response to the outbreak, since the lab and molecular detection work that links far-apart cases was not being done. Individual states can use their own resources to pinpoint the source of contaminated food, but they won’t have access to federal government databases.

Many consumer groups have been lobbying the USDA to change the way salmonella outbreaks are handled so that the government can force recalls, arguing that more dangerous strains of salmonella resistant to antibiotics have emerged in recent years.

Consumers who are buying chicken should simply avoid any brand sold with the following plant numbers: P-6137, P-6137A and P-7632. The number can be found on or underneath the packaging label.

Oct 04

[video]

Oct 03

News Roundup! Thursday October 3, 2013

scienceandfooducla:

Harvard EdX Course: Science and Cooking
If you’ve ever wanted to take a class at Harvard, here’s your chance! Harvard is offering an online EdX version of its popular course "SPU27x: Science and Cooking - From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Physics." Class starts October 8th and registration for the course is FREE.
During each week of the course, Ferran Adrià and other top chefs will reveal the secrets of some of their most famous culinary creations—often right in their own restaurants. Alongside this cooking mastery, the Harvard instructors will explain the science behind the recipe. Other guest instructors include David Chang, Wylie Dufresne, Dave Arnold, and Harold McGee.
Register for “Science and Cooking” at EdX

Signal boost!

scienceandfooducla:

Harvard EdX Course: Science and Cooking

If you’ve ever wanted to take a class at Harvard, here’s your chance! Harvard is offering an online EdX version of its popular course "SPU27x: Science and Cooking - From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Physics." Class starts October 8th and registration for the course is FREE.

During each week of the course, Ferran Adrià and other top chefs will reveal the secrets of some of their most famous culinary creations—often right in their own restaurants. Alongside this cooking mastery, the Harvard instructors will explain the science behind the recipe. Other guest instructors include David Chang, Wylie Dufresne, Dave Arnold, and Harold McGee.

Register for “Science and Cooking” at EdX

Signal boost!

(Source: scienceandfood)

Sep 28

“Building on the existing network of small farmers is far preferable to throwing them off the land in favor of large-scale mechanized farming.” —

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton, in a pretty epic interview with Modern Farmer, discusses the greatest challenges to our food systems (rapid population growth and unhealthy eating choices in countries where food is readily available), how sustainable agriculture can help reverse climate change, and the importance of investing in smallholders and rural agriculture. Regarding efforts on the latter, Clinton says there have been “extraordinarily outsized returns — not only for the individual farmers, but also for their national economies.”

Clinton goes into detail explaining how the foundations he’s involved in have helped smallholders by filling gaps in the supply chain and giving the farmers access to good, fairly priced seeds and fertilizer. He’s also pushing initiatives to empower female farmers (“women’s participation is a proven way to help an economy thrive”), and much more. It’s a vital read.

(via themadfeed)

Sep 25

Report: “The Dating Game: How Confusing Food Labels Leads to Food Waste in America”

I’m sure you’ve heard a lot about how we’re wasting food by looking at the “best by” or “sell by” dates on a carton of milk.

Well, it’s all true…but it’s not necessarily your fault. 

A report by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Harvard Food Law and Policy clinic has found that there are inconsistencies across the nation and that the industry is really a “wild west” when it comes to how dates are set, whether or not these dates are found on the packaging, and what these dates actually mean.

And that these inconsistencies are influencing consumer behaviors.

In other words, the system is a mess.

The report also lists several intriguing suggestions for fixing this problem:

  1. "Sell by dates"—dates which should be used internally by retailers to indicate peak freshness—should be made invisible for consumers.
  2. Dates intended for consumer use should use clear language, be located on the same place on packaging, and should be based on standardized “best practices.”
  3. "Freeze by" dates would be helpful in promoting the benefits of freezing foods before they go bad.
  4. Safety information such as time-temperature indicators and QR codes to track food would allow consumers to scan for more information.

“We can see the Scarecrow’s farm for ourselves, but we have to trust Chipotle’s assertions that its suppliers meet its standards. The Scarecrow uses only ingredients that conform to his values, but when Chipotle runs out of sustainable beef, a decidedly less happy cow could end up marinated and grilled and nestled beside our cilantro-lime rice. And Sirota’s criticism stands: “The Scarecrow” is powerful in part because it elides Chipotle’s real-life meat sourcing with the aesthetics of a vegetable harvest.” — What Does “The Scarecrow” Tell Us About Chipotle? via The New Yorker

Sep 24

[video]